Pool Safety for Cats

We’ve talked about pool safety for dogs, but we don’t want to leave our feline friends out. Now that the weather is nice, and summer is here, many of our kitties are spending time outside. Here’s how to keep them safe around the water.

Let’s look at pool safety for cats.

We’ve talked about pool safety for dogs, but we don’t want to leave our feline friends out. Now that the weather is nice, and summer is here, many of our kitties are spending time outside.

While most cats don’t like water, some do, and it’s still important to take measures to keep your kitties safe and keep them from drowning.

Let’s look at pool safety for cats.

Teach Your Cat to Swim

You know that most cats will avoid the water, but it’s still a good idea to teach your cat what to do if she falls into the pool.

This might just save her life, and who knows, she might find swimming in the pool fun.

The best thing you can do for your cat is to introduce him/her to the water slowly. Keep the cat in your arms during the first exposure.

Do be sure and protect your arms from kitty’s claws – a wetsuit or gloves is always helpful.

You can gradually let go more and more until kitty’s instinct takes over, and she starts swimming on her own. Do be patient though as this can take some time.

Provide Your Cat Entry and Exit Assistance

As with your small dogs, you want to give your cat an easy entry and exit into the pool.

While it’s often easier to get in, as your kitty (or dog) gets out, they’ll find that their water-soaked fur is heavy, making it difficult for them to get out.

If your cat really takes to the pool and enjoys being in it, provide her with a ramp so she can casually walk in and easily walk out. Do an online search for a pet ramp.

Dry Your Cat’s Ears

After your water-loving cat has come out of the pool, it’s important to dry out his ears. If you don’t, the pool water can sit in the outer ear canal, leading to bacterial growth, infection and quite a lot of pain.

Keep your cat’s ears clear of infection by making sure the ears are always dry. Use soft cotton balls or a small, super soft towel.

Keep Fresh Water Around

If your cat is outside near the pool, make sure she has plenty of fresh water for drinking. Set it in clear sight but in the shade if possible. This will keep her from drinking your pool water that is full of chemicals.

In addition, be sure to either rinse your cat off after they swim in the pool with water or use a wet towel. Then, dry her thoroughly.

You know that cats are continually in grooming mode, so you want to make sure there are no chemicals left on her fur.

Install an Alarm

Whether you have cats, dogs, kids or people wandering your neighborhood, a pool alarm is a good idea.

It may mean the difference between life or death.

Pool alarms detect disturbances on the water’s surface and can alert you to danger. Or, you can purchase a water-detecting collar for your pet that alerts you if your cat gets in the pool without you.

Learn Cat CPR

You can also be prepared by learning kitty CPR.

Knowing how to resuscitate your cat after they get caught in the pool helps you provide life-saving techniques for a better outcome. If you do have to perform CPR, you want to take your cat to the veterinarian afterwards just to make sure she’s okay.

Final Thoughts

When it comes to pool safety for cats, the best thing you can do is be prepared. Take these tips and use the ones that work best for you and your furry feline.

Have questions about how to keep other animals and pets safe in the pool? Be sure to ask – we are here for you!